10 most disliked Star Trek episodes of all time, ranked

Among all 900 episodes in the Star Trek franchise, we have the ones everyone loves. We also have ones that every loves to hate. Let's check them out.

Jeri Ryan as Seven of Nine in "The Next Generation" Episode 301, Star Trek: Picard on Paramount+. Photo Credit: Trae Patton/Paramount+. ©2021 Viacom, International Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Jeri Ryan as Seven of Nine in "The Next Generation" Episode 301, Star Trek: Picard on Paramount+. Photo Credit: Trae Patton/Paramount+. ©2021 Viacom, International Inc. All Rights Reserved. /
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10. "The Magicks of Megas-Tu" - Star Trek: The Animated Series (season 1, episode 8)

"The Magicks of Megas-Tu" takes us on a whimsical space odyssey, but it's one that even the most devoted Trekkies often wish they could erase from their memories. The USS Enterprise, boldly going where no man has gone before, stumbles upon the center of the galaxy, only to be whisked away to a fantastical world called Megas-Tu.

This isn't your typical Star Trek fare; it's a realm where the laws of physics are on a coffee break, and magic rules the day. The crew, in their ever-curious manner, befriends a satyr-like creature named Lucien - much like Mr. Tumnus from Narnia with a Starfleet communicator badge.

Now, the premise might sound a little fun or even like a refreshing twist, but alas, it spirals into such a misadventure that struggles to find its footing in the Star Trek universe. The episode plays out like a bizarre space-fantasy mashup that leaves viewers wondering if the Enterprise accidentally took a wrong turn at Albuquerque and ended up in a different franchise. Magic in Star Trek? That's like finding a unicorn in a physics lab - intriguing, but wildly out of place.

The story attempts to connect these magical elements to Earth's history of witch trials, with Captain Kirk and crew standing trial for humanity's past misdeeds against "witches." It's a leap that would require Spock's Vulcan logic on steroids to make sense of. In essence, "The Magicks of Megas-Tu" becomes a bizarre detour in the Star Trek saga, one that's more than just "boldly going".