10 most disliked Star Trek episodes of all time, ranked

Among all 900 episodes in the Star Trek franchise, we have the ones everyone loves. We also have ones that every loves to hate. Let's check them out.

Jeri Ryan as Seven of Nine in "The Next Generation" Episode 301, Star Trek: Picard on Paramount+. Photo Credit: Trae Patton/Paramount+. ©2021 Viacom, International Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Jeri Ryan as Seven of Nine in "The Next Generation" Episode 301, Star Trek: Picard on Paramount+. Photo Credit: Trae Patton/Paramount+. ©2021 Viacom, International Inc. All Rights Reserved. /
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6. "These Are the Voyages" - Star Trek: Enterprise (season 4, episode 22)

"These Are the Voyages", has the dubious honor of being one of the worst finales in the Star Trek franchise history, and it's not hard to see why. Imagine you're at a grand party, celebrating the end of a bold journey, only to have the host suddenly switch the theme to a sad remembrance. That's essentially what happened here.

The episode, set in the 22nd century, oddly decides to time travel to the 24th century, using our favorite tall and charming character Will Riker from The Next Generation as a narrative crutch. It's like being in the final act of a Shakespearean play, and suddenly, Hamlet walks in, wondering if he's in the wrong theater. The ambitious crossover, instead of serving as a loving homage, feels more like a story hijacking, downgrading the actual Enterprise crew and shoving them to the background in their own finale.

The episode doesn't just play fast and loose with timelines - it also decides to serve up a large slice of tragedy, with a side of existential crisis. Major character arcs are hastily wrapped up, with some outcomes feeling more like an afterthought than a well-deserved send-off. The narrative leapfrogs through significant events with the grace of a kangaroo on a pogo stick, leaving us all both confused and unsatisfied.

It's similar to reading a mystery novel where the last chapter was hastily scrawled on a napkin, revealing that the butler did it, but without any of the satisfying buildup. In trying to be a grand, all-encompassing finale, "These Are the Voyages" ends up feeling more like a bunch of things stacked on each other, leaving fans of the "Enterprise" series feeling like they were left holding the short end of the stick.