4 most disliked storylines in Battlestar Galactica

Let's go over four of the most disliked plot points and episodes within the 2004 reboot, in hope someone important will read this and these mistakes won't be committed once again.

BATTLESTAR GALACTICA -- Season 3 -- Pictured: (l-r) Michael Hogan as Colonel Saul Tigh, Mary McDonnell as President Laura Roslin, Edward James Olmos as Admiral William Adama, Jamie Bamber as Captain Lee "Apollo" Adama, James Callis as Dr. Gaius Baltar, Kattee Sackhoff as Lt. Kara "Starbuck" Thrace, Tahmoh Penikett as Captain Karl "Helo" Agathon, Grace Park as Number Eight, Tricia Helfer as Number Six -- (Photo by: Justin Stephens/Syfy/NBCU Photo Bank)
BATTLESTAR GALACTICA -- Season 3 -- Pictured: (l-r) Michael Hogan as Colonel Saul Tigh, Mary McDonnell as President Laura Roslin, Edward James Olmos as Admiral William Adama, Jamie Bamber as Captain Lee "Apollo" Adama, James Callis as Dr. Gaius Baltar, Kattee Sackhoff as Lt. Kara "Starbuck" Thrace, Tahmoh Penikett as Captain Karl "Helo" Agathon, Grace Park as Number Eight, Tricia Helfer as Number Six -- (Photo by: Justin Stephens/Syfy/NBCU Photo Bank) /
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3) "The Woman King" (Season 3, Episode 14)

"The Woman King" truly dives headfirst into the "What were they thinking?" pool with the enthusiasm of a toddler in a mud puddle.

Picture our hero, Helo, typically known for soaring through the stars, now grounded and babysitting a group of refugees. It's honestly like expecting a racehorse to take up knitting. Helo's golden heart is supposed to shine here, but then comes the twist that's more bewildering than finding a fish riding a bicycle. The refugees, facing a health crisis, are wary of treatment, thanks to their beliefs. Enter stage left, Dr. Robert, a fresh face meant to be the beacon of hope, who instead flips the script and reveals himself as the baddie. This plot twist hits us with all the grace of a fish slap, making us question if the writers' room was moonlighting as a carnival game booth, tossing ideas at random targets to see what sticks.

This storyline was ripe with potential, ready to dive deep into the meaty topics of bias, belief systems, and healthcare ethics, all set against the backdrop of humanity's fight for survival. However, it ends up feeling like a clown car of concepts, trying to fit too much into too little space, and ultimately, the narrative wheels come off. It leaves our characters, and by extension, us viewers, in a bewildering maze of "What's the actual point here?" questions. It stands out as a bewildering blip in the epic saga of "Battlestar Galactica," akin to taking a scenic route only to find it's a dead end.

This episode doesn't just miss the mark; it launches the arrow into a different time zone, cementing its place as one of the series' more perplexing plot excursions.