7 worst CGI moments in the DCEU, ranked from bad to worst

Let's take a look at seven iconically bad CGI moments that ruined some of the biggest DCEU moments.

Ray Fisher (Cyborg / Victor Stone), Ezra Miller (The Flash / Barry Allen), Ben Affleck (Batman / Bruce Wayne), Henry Cavill (Superman / Clark Kent), Gal Gadot (Diana Prince / Wonder Woman), Jason Momoa (Aquaman / Arthur Curry) in Zack Snyder's Justice League. Photograph by Courtesy of HBO Max
Ray Fisher (Cyborg / Victor Stone), Ezra Miller (The Flash / Barry Allen), Ben Affleck (Batman / Bruce Wayne), Henry Cavill (Superman / Clark Kent), Gal Gadot (Diana Prince / Wonder Woman), Jason Momoa (Aquaman / Arthur Curry) in Zack Snyder's Justice League. Photograph by Courtesy of HBO Max /
facebooktwitterreddit
Prev
2 of 5
Next

1. The Flash's speed effects in Justice League (2017) and The Flash (2023)

Imagine you're watching Justice League (2017), eagerly waiting to see The Flash zip through the streets, dodging obstacles faster than you can blink. But when he finally takes off, it's... well, a bit of a letdown, which is kind of an understatement.

The Flash's speed effects, which should have left us all in awe, felt more like a high-speed train running through a tunnel painted with neon lights. It's not that it looked terrible - it's more about what it could have been. Instead of feeling like we're witnessing the incredible speed of a superhero, it kind of felt like watching a video game character on fast-forward. The filmmakers went for a very specific visual style to showcase his speed - bright, flashy lines streaking behind him, almost like someone got a bit too excited with the glow effect in their graphics software. It wasn't an overall disaster, but it missed that wow factor. The creative choice aimed for distinctiveness but ended up sacrificing some of the raw, thrilling potential of The Flash's super-speed for a look that didn't quite hit the mark with everyone.

Fast forward to 2023's The Flash, and you'd think they'd have all the kinks worked out, right? Well, it's a bit of a mixed bag. The movie certainly tries to up the stakes, aiming to give us that heart-pounding sensation of breaking the sound barrier. But despite the improvements, some fans still felt the effects didn't fully capture the essence of The Flash's incredible abilities. It's like when you upgrade your phone to the latest model, expecting it to be light years ahead, but then you realize the camera still takes blurry photos of your dog in dim lighting - kind of annoying.

The efforts to polish and refine The Flash's speedy excursions are evident, and they do deserve a nod for trying. However, the challenge of visually translating the exhilarating speed of the fastest man alive into something that not only looks cool but feels real and tangible still seems to be just out of reach for the franchise. It's not the worst CGI moment out there, and it definitely shows a commitment to creative vision, but it leaves us thinking about the unbridled potential of what could have been, had the execution matched the ambition.