All 11 The Flash suits ranked from worst to best

We've seen so many suits donned by the Scarlet Speedster over the years, but which of The Flash's outfits is the very best?

The Flash -- "Nora" -- Image Number: FLA501b_0031b.jpg -- Pictured: Grant Gustin as The Flash -- Photo: Katie Yu/The CW -- © 2018 The CW Network, LLC. All rights reserved
The Flash -- "Nora" -- Image Number: FLA501b_0031b.jpg -- Pictured: Grant Gustin as The Flash -- Photo: Katie Yu/The CW -- © 2018 The CW Network, LLC. All rights reserved /
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The Flash -- "Nora" -- Image Number: FLA501b_0004b.jpg -- Pictured: Grant Gustin as The Flash -- Photo: Katie Yu/The CW -- © 2018 The CW Network, LLC. All rights reserved /

3. The Flash (2014 TV series' first suit)

Worn by: Grant Gustin

When the Scarlet Speedster made his first appearance on live-action television in two decades, he needed a modern suit to bring him into the modern day. That suit made its debut in the pilot episode of The CW's The Flash and quickly became the definitive look for the classic DC hero.

A red skin-tight bodysuit introduced by Cisco Ramon (though it was really a jacket and pants), the Flash uniform was originally intended to replace the turnouts worn by firefighters. It was resistant to Barry's speed, making it the perfect uniform for him to run through Central City in. Of course, it had to be modified for its use as a superhero suit, with a li8ghtning bolt symbol being added soon afterwards.

There were some minor variations made to it throughout those first three seasons, including a new cowl and the shift from the red lightning bolt symbol to the more comic-accurate white one. It was also more maroon than red, which initially raised some eyebrows; but the overall design and quality of the suit was so good that it instantly became the best live-action look for the Scarlet Speedster at the time.

In fact, as Grant Gustin wore this during The Flash's early days (and when it had its biggest audience), it's widely regarded as the definitive look for the hero. And honestly, it's easy to see why.