All 32 DC TV shows ranked from worst to best

From Batman to Superman and Lois, DC TV has been a staple of our lives for decades, But which of the many DC shows is the very best?

The Flash -- "When Harry Met Harry..." -- Image Number: FLA406b_0300b.jpg -- Pictured: Grant Gustin as The Flash -- Photo: Katie Yu/The CW -- © 2017 The CW Network, LLC. All rights reserved.
The Flash -- "When Harry Met Harry..." -- Image Number: FLA406b_0300b.jpg -- Pictured: Grant Gustin as The Flash -- Photo: Katie Yu/The CW -- © 2017 The CW Network, LLC. All rights reserved. /
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Peacemaker, DC TV
John Cena in Peacemaker Season 1, Episode 5. Photograph by Katie Yu/HBO Max. /

15. Peacemaker (2022 - present)

The DCEU came to the small screen for its first and only series Peacemaker, but fans of the show will be thankful to know that it will continue on as part of James Gunn and Peter Safran's new DC Universe instead. And speaking of James Gunn, he is the one responsible for this series, which quickly became something of an unexpected fan-favorite.

A spinoff of Gunn's The Suicide Squad, the series brought back John Cena as the title character in an adventure that can only be described as bloody, off-the-wall, outrageous, and hilarious all at the same time. It's very in-your-face, and very much an acquired taste as a result, so even if it doesn't appeal to all DC fans, those who do enjoy it absolutely love it.

The show is surprisingly great (I know I wasn't expecting to enjoy it as much as I did, and I was a fan of The Suicide Squad!) and it's very much the sum of its parts. Cena is brilliant in the leading role and the ensemble cast is equally as impressive. And if you're not dancing and singing along to the theme song every time the opening credits roll on your screen, then you just don't enjoy fun!

Adventures of Superman, George Reeves and Phyllis Coates, DC TV
George Reeves as Superman / John Springer Collection/GettyImages

14. Adventures of Superman (1952 - 1958)

The very first DC TV series ever made, Adventures of Superman brought the Man of Steel to the small screen for the first time ever. Produced for syndication, it starred George Reeves as Superman and entertained a whole generation for six seasons.

The show is renowned for the pivot it made during its run. The first seasons were filmed in black-and-white, which allowed for some surprisingly gritty and mature storylines, with the show often coming of as more of a noir drama than a superhero series. After the move to color, it got less serious, more campy, and more outlandish. Both are considered important parts of the show's legacy, but it is interesting to think about what its run could have looked like if it stayed the course with one tone or another.

Adventures of Superman turned the Man of Steel into a household name and it launched DC's presence on the small screen. I think it's safe to say it made one heck of an impression, as did George Reeves' performance as the legendary hero.