All 32 DC TV shows ranked from worst to best

From Batman to Superman and Lois, DC TV has been a staple of our lives for decades, But which of the many DC shows is the very best?

The Flash -- "When Harry Met Harry..." -- Image Number: FLA406b_0300b.jpg -- Pictured: Grant Gustin as The Flash -- Photo: Katie Yu/The CW -- © 2017 The CW Network, LLC. All rights reserved.
The Flash -- "When Harry Met Harry..." -- Image Number: FLA406b_0300b.jpg -- Pictured: Grant Gustin as The Flash -- Photo: Katie Yu/The CW -- © 2017 The CW Network, LLC. All rights reserved. /
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32. Swamp Thing (1990 - 1993)

There's a bit of a sad irony in the fact that one of DC's most horrifying characters also spawned one of its campiest TV shows, but that's the unusual charm of Swamp Thing; who became rather popular in the live-action field in the '80s and '90s. After the success of Wes Craven's more horror-focused movie and its campier sequel, the creature made his way to TV.

While actor Dick Durock made the journey to the small screen too and once again delivered a great performance, the first film's charm did not come along the for the ride. The show was ridiculously campy and honestly very silly, with its low production values making it feel much older than a '90s series.

In its defense, the show did become surprisingly popular for USA Network, gaining a cult audience throughout its run, and the suit that Durock wore was far superior to the one in the first movie. The potential was there, but Swamp Thing needed better writing.

But if you're a fan of unserious content, this one might be for you.

31. The Secrets of Isis (1975 - 1976)

The Secrets of Isis is probably one of the lesser-known DC TV shows, but an even lesser-known fact was that it was actually the first ever female-led superhero series. Yes, it's true; the show aired in September 1975, coming just before Wonder Woman's December pilot (and 1976 launch), and Bionic Woman's January 1976 premiere. Unfortunately, it hasn't aged as well as either of those shows.

The show focused on schoolteacher Andrea Thomas who could transform into the Egyptian Goddess whenever she was needed to stop any wrongdoing or put things right. It followed the format of the typical superhero show at the time, but its production values were low, which isn't all that surprising given that it was technically a spinoff of Shazam!, which also hasn't aged well (don't worry, we're getting to that shortly).

The late, great Joanna Cameron's performance was undoubtedly the show's greatest aspect as she was quite wonderful in the role.