All 32 DC TV shows ranked from worst to best

From Batman to Superman and Lois, DC TV has been a staple of our lives for decades, But which of the many DC shows is the very best?

The Flash -- "When Harry Met Harry..." -- Image Number: FLA406b_0300b.jpg -- Pictured: Grant Gustin as The Flash -- Photo: Katie Yu/The CW -- © 2017 The CW Network, LLC. All rights reserved.
The Flash -- "When Harry Met Harry..." -- Image Number: FLA406b_0300b.jpg -- Pictured: Grant Gustin as The Flash -- Photo: Katie Yu/The CW -- © 2017 The CW Network, LLC. All rights reserved. /
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30. Superboy (1988 - 1992)

These days, Superboy refers to DC Comics character Kon-El, but in the '80s, it was the name used by the Man of Steel during his early years of heroics. Those early years inspired a TV series by the same name and, well, it's been somewhat lost to history over the years. It's nowhere near as old as the original wave of DC TV shows and yet it hasn't aged as well as most of them either.

The series was incredibly low budget and it showed pretty much all of the time. It was a bit corny and the first season's storylines received criticism for its lack of faithfulness to the comics. In fairness to the show, it did right that wrong in its second season, opting for a more comic-accurate approach which actually made it feel like more of an inherently Superman show.

Superboy was not well-received and it's a bit infamous because it replaced actor John Haymes Newton with Gerard Christopher after the first season, but it was popular enough to last for four seasons and there is something of a nostalgic charm to it, too.

29. Shazam! (1974 - 1976)

You might be a bit shocked to see Shazam! down this low on the list, but honestly you're probably even more shocked to know that a Shazam series existed. It ran for three seasons on CBS on Saturday mornings between 1974 and 1976 and it just wasn't very good. Of course production values weren't great so that's not the main issue, it's just that it fell a bit flat compared to other superhero shows of the time like Batman and Wonder Woman. It hasn't aged as well either.

The show infamously dismissed Jackson Bostwick, who played the title character part-way through the second season, leading to a rather quick actor change. Now considering this is a show in which its primary character is a kid who becomes a fully-grown adult superhero when he says "Shazam!", the fact that he inexplicably changed into a completely different fully-grown adult superhero was no doubt confusing for young viewers watching at the time.

There were also some questionable liberties taken for TV, including the mysterious Mentor character who, while endearing, didn't have an actual name - not to mention the fact that he and Billy Batson randomly drove around in an RV. Oh, the '70s were an unusual time for comic book adaptations.