10 most disliked Star Trek episodes of all time, ranked

Among all 900 episodes in the Star Trek franchise, we have the ones everyone loves. We also have ones that every loves to hate. Let's check them out.

Jeri Ryan as Seven of Nine in "The Next Generation" Episode 301, Star Trek: Picard on Paramount+. Photo Credit: Trae Patton/Paramount+. ©2021 Viacom, International Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Jeri Ryan as Seven of Nine in "The Next Generation" Episode 301, Star Trek: Picard on Paramount+. Photo Credit: Trae Patton/Paramount+. ©2021 Viacom, International Inc. All Rights Reserved. /
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8. "Shades of Gray" - Star Trek: The Next Generation (season 2, episode 22)

Star Trek: The Next Generation is a beloved series known for its engaging stories and deep exploration of ethical and philosophical issues. But the season 2 finale, "Shades of Gray," boldly goes where no episode will ever go again – into the realm of the much-dreaded clip show.

Commander Riker is struck down by a mysterious alien infection, lying helplessly in sickbay. What's the cure? A walk down memory lane, apparently. The episode turns into a highlight reel of Riker's past experiences, reusing footage from previous episodes. Imagine tuning in for a fresh adventure and getting a "previously on Star Trek" segment that lasts the whole episode. Nice budget-saving strategy.

This trip down memory lane isn't just any stroll through the park. It's more like being stuck on a slow-moving conveyor belt at the least exciting parts of an amusement park. The episode recycles emotional and action-packed moments, trying to bring a sense of nostalgia and urgency. But instead of combining these flashbacks into a new and compelling twist in the story, "Shades of Gray" feels more like a quilt made by someone who only learned to sew yesterday – it's functional, but you wouldn't want to show it off.

The episode is unsurprisingly often critiqued for its lack of originality and creativity, standing out as a sore thumb in a series celebrated for its innovative storytelling. It's a testament to the power of storytelling in Star Trek – when it's good, it's out of this world; when it's bad, it's like being stuck in a malfunctioning holodeck that only plays reruns.