10 most disliked Star Trek episodes of all time, ranked

Among all 900 episodes in the Star Trek franchise, we have the ones everyone loves. We also have ones that every loves to hate. Let's check them out.

Jeri Ryan as Seven of Nine in "The Next Generation" Episode 301, Star Trek: Picard on Paramount+. Photo Credit: Trae Patton/Paramount+. ©2021 Viacom, International Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Jeri Ryan as Seven of Nine in "The Next Generation" Episode 301, Star Trek: Picard on Paramount+. Photo Credit: Trae Patton/Paramount+. ©2021 Viacom, International Inc. All Rights Reserved. /
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5. "Let He Who Is Without Sin..." - Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (season 5, episode 7)

"Let He Who Is Without Sin..." is often cited as a major misstep in an otherwise stellar series, and it's not hard to see why. Imagine Worf and Jadzia Dax, two of the most intriguing characters on the show, deciding to take a little romantic getaway to Risa, the infamous pleasure planet of the Star Trek universe. Sounds like the setup for a fun, character-driven episode, right? Wrong!

Instead of exploring the depths of their relationship or the cultural complexities of a Klingon-Trill romance, the episode dives headfirst into a ham-fisted morality tale. Worf, usually a bastion of honor and complexity, is reduced to a grumpy party pooper, joining a group of joyless revolutionaries who believe the Federation is becoming too self-indulgent. The plot clumsily tries to juggle themes of freedom, responsibility, and cultural differences but ends up dropping all the balls in a spectacular fashion.

The episode's failure is partly due to its heavy-handed approach to serious topics, which feels more like a lecture than an engaging story. Worf's character is uncharacteristically judgmental and rigid, straying from his previously established persona. This not only betrays the character's depth but also undermines the dynamic he shares with Jadzia.

The episode's attempt to critique hedonism and the perceived moral decay of the Federation feels out of place in the utopian vision of Star Trek. Instead of the subtle exploration of ideals that Star Trek is known for, viewers are treated to a clumsy, almost sitcom-ish plot that lacks the distinctiveness and thoughtfulness expected from the franchise.