10 most disliked Star Trek episodes of all time, ranked

Among all 900 episodes in the Star Trek franchise, we have the ones everyone loves. We also have ones that every loves to hate. Let's check them out.

Jeri Ryan as Seven of Nine in "The Next Generation" Episode 301, Star Trek: Picard on Paramount+. Photo Credit: Trae Patton/Paramount+. ©2021 Viacom, International Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Jeri Ryan as Seven of Nine in "The Next Generation" Episode 301, Star Trek: Picard on Paramount+. Photo Credit: Trae Patton/Paramount+. ©2021 Viacom, International Inc. All Rights Reserved. /
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3. "Turnabout Intruder" - Star Trek: The Original Series (season 3, episode 24)

"Turnabout Intruder," the final episode of Star Trek: The Original Series, is often regarded with a mix of disappointment and disbelief, like the last slice of pizza that somehow tastes like cardboard. The episode's central plot, involving a body swap between Captain Kirk and Dr. Janice Lester, seemed more like a sci-fi soap opera twist than a fitting finale to a groundbreaking series.

Lester, driven by a mix of envy and unrequited love, hijacks Kirk's body to fulfill her own command ambitions, a plot that could have been intriguing if not for its clumsy execution. The episode is infamous for its less-than-stellar handling of gender politics. Dr. Lester's motivation, rooted in a kind of gender envy, comes across as a misfired commentary on women in power, making the episode feel like a missed opportunity in an otherwise progressive show.

Also, "Turnabout Intruder" suffers from a case of plot clumsiness. The body-swap trope, while a staple in sci-fi, felt undercooked and served with a side of completely over-the-top, cringey acting. Shatner's portrayal of Lester-in-Kirk's body sways back and forth between exaggerated and downright cringe-worthy, like watching your uncle trying to act "hip" at a family reunion.

The episode's conclusion, resolving the body-swap with a convenient return to the status quo, leaves viewers with a sense of narrative blue balls. It's an anticlimactic end to the pioneering series, like expecting a grand fireworks display but getting a sparkler instead. This episode is often cited as a weak link in the Star Trek chain, remembered not for its daring exploration of new worlds, but as a stumble right at the finish line - unfortunate.