Star Trek: 8 most disliked Captain Kirk moments of all time, ranked

Captain James Tiberius Kirk is pretty famous for his endeavors in Star Trek. But all of the moments he graces the screen aren't all sunshine and rainbows.

Nov. 2, 2015 – CBS Television Studios announced today it will launch a totally new “Star Trek” television series in January 2017. The brand-new “Star Trek” will introduce new characters seeking imaginative new worlds and new civilizations, while exploring the dramatic contemporary themes that have been a signature of the franchise since its inception in 1966. The new series will blast off with a special preview broadcast on the CBS Television Network. The premiere episode and all subsequent
Nov. 2, 2015 – CBS Television Studios announced today it will launch a totally new “Star Trek” television series in January 2017. The brand-new “Star Trek” will introduce new characters seeking imaginative new worlds and new civilizations, while exploring the dramatic contemporary themes that have been a signature of the franchise since its inception in 1966. The new series will blast off with a special preview broadcast on the CBS Television Network. The premiere episode and all subsequent /
facebooktwitterreddit
Prev
6 of 9
Next

4. The incident in "The Apple"

Once upon a time, Captain James T. Kirk and his merry band of space explorers meander onto a planet that looks like it's been decked out for an eternal luau, complete with an all-knowing, all-seeing computer god named Vaal.

This isn't your average beach party, though. Vaal's got the local inhabitants living in a sort of blissful ignorance, munching on fruit and chilling in the sun, but without any of the fun stuff like love, creativity, or making little inhabitants. Kirk, in a move that screams "I didn't come here to make friends," decides that this computer-controlled paradise is no way to live. So, what does he do? He goes full Kirk on it. The Enterprise crew launches a full-scale attack on poor Vaal, blowing it to smithereens and leaving the locals to figure out life without their electronic overlord.

Now, why did this rub some fans the wrong way? Well, it felt a tad imperialistic. Imagine cruising to someone's home, deciding you don't like their lifestyle, and then rearranging their furniture, so to speak, without so much as a "by your leave." It's the space equivalent of walking into someone's house and declaring their feng shui all wrong. This episode, "The Apple," stirs up quite the debate about the Prime Directive – Starfleet's number one rule about not interfering with other cultures. Kirk's actions seem to toss that rule out the nearest airlock, as he usually does when it's convenient.

Fans were left raising eyebrows, wondering if our hero just decided to play galactic redecorator because he didn't like the aesthetic. It's a classic moment of "did he really just do that?" in the Star Trek saga, showcasing Kirk's cowboy diplomacy in full force, but also sparking conversations about ethics, morality, and the intricacies of cultural interference in the vast playground of the cosmos.