Star Trek: 8 most disliked Captain Kirk moments of all time, ranked

Captain James Tiberius Kirk is pretty famous for his endeavors in Star Trek. But all of the moments he graces the screen aren't all sunshine and rainbows.

Nov. 2, 2015 – CBS Television Studios announced today it will launch a totally new “Star Trek” television series in January 2017. The brand-new “Star Trek” will introduce new characters seeking imaginative new worlds and new civilizations, while exploring the dramatic contemporary themes that have been a signature of the franchise since its inception in 1966. The new series will blast off with a special preview broadcast on the CBS Television Network. The premiere episode and all subsequent
Nov. 2, 2015 – CBS Television Studios announced today it will launch a totally new “Star Trek” television series in January 2017. The brand-new “Star Trek” will introduce new characters seeking imaginative new worlds and new civilizations, while exploring the dramatic contemporary themes that have been a signature of the franchise since its inception in 1966. The new series will blast off with a special preview broadcast on the CBS Television Network. The premiere episode and all subsequent /
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2. "Turnabout Intruder" and its heavy gender stereotypes

Captain James T. Kirk, the fearless leader of the USS Enterprise, known for his wit, bravery, and occasionally bending the rules to save the day, trapped in a soap opera twist that would make even the boldest space explorer cringe. What episode could I be talking about? Enter "Turnabout Intruder," the final episode of the original Star Trek series, where we find our hero in a body-swapping pickle with Dr. Janice Lester, his ex-girlfriend.

Lester, harboring a grudge and ambition as vast as the final frontier itself, decides the best course of action is to swap bodies with Kirk, because, obviously, being a starship captain is the ultimate revenge. Makes total sense. The catch? The episode seems to suggest that Lester's ultimate downfall is not her nefarious scheme but her apparent inability to cope with the power "because she's a woman". Big. Yikes.

In a twist that feels more at home in a Shakespearean comedy than a progressive science fiction series, "Turnabout Intruder" manages to simultaneously bewilder and disappoint. The episode not only serves up a heaping portion of gender stereotypes but also implies that leadership and emotional instability are gendered traits. Kirk, in Lester's body, must prove his true identity to his crew, all while battling the stereotype that women can't handle positions of power without succumbing to hysteria.

The crew's skepticism of Lester-as-Kirk's sudden emotional outbursts and irrational decisions underscores a cringeworthy message: women in power = chaos. Fast forward to today's standards, where inclusivity and gender equality are (thankfully and for the most part) part of the ongoing conversation, and it's no wonder this episode feels like opening a time capsule filled with outdated notions best left in the past.

"Turnabout Intruder" boldly went where no episode should go, turning it into one of the most facepalm-worthy moments in Captain Kirk's otherwise stellar career.