All 13 X-Men movies ranked from worst to best

They're all a blend of high-octane action, complex characters, and, let's be honest, a timeline more tangled than the headphones in your pocket, but which X-Men movie takes the number 1 spot?

087_ad_3690_v3099_left.1073_2 – Apocalypse (Oscar Isaac), the original and most powerful mutant, embarks on a path of global destruction. Photo Credit: Courtesy Twentieth Century Fox.
087_ad_3690_v3099_left.1073_2 – Apocalypse (Oscar Isaac), the original and most powerful mutant, embarks on a path of global destruction. Photo Credit: Courtesy Twentieth Century Fox. /
facebooktwitterreddit
Prev
5 of 14
Next

10. X-Men: The Last Stand (2006)

As a huge fan of the original X-Men movies, it makes me a smidge sad to leave X-Men: The Last Stand perched somewhat shakily at number 10 in the grand lineup of 13 X-Men movies.

Imagine you're at an all-you-can-eat buffet, and you pile your plate high with all sorts of goodies. That's kind of what the filmmakers did here - except the goodies are plot points, characters, and action scenes. The result? A cinematic plate so loaded it's hard to get a taste of everything before it all tumbles off. This movie tried to juggle a lot: Jean Grey's dark transformation, a "cure" for mutancy, and a myriad of other subplots. It's like they had a checklist of every cool X-Men idea and tried to tick them all off in under two hours. Exciting? Sure. Easy to follow? Not so much.

Now, let's talk about the superheroes and villains who got their RSVP to the party but barely got to dance. Characters that fans had been itching to see more of were given the equivalent of a cameo on steroids - they showed up, flexed a little, and then were shuffled off to the side to make room for the next big spectacle. This left many viewers feeling like they'd been promised a rock concert but ended up watching the world's most expensive soundcheck instead. The movie wasn't a total bust, though, it had its moments of glory and box office success to boot. But in a franchise filled with heavy hitters, X-Men: The Last Stand ended up feeling like the awkward middle child: trying to be everything to everyone and not quite fully satisfying anyone.

It's the cinematic equivalent of biting into a jam-packed sandwich and realizing half the fillings have slipped out the back.