All 13 X-Men movies ranked from worst to best

They're all a blend of high-octane action, complex characters, and, let's be honest, a timeline more tangled than the headphones in your pocket, but which X-Men movie takes the number 1 spot?

087_ad_3690_v3099_left.1073_2 – Apocalypse (Oscar Isaac), the original and most powerful mutant, embarks on a path of global destruction. Photo Credit: Courtesy Twentieth Century Fox.
087_ad_3690_v3099_left.1073_2 – Apocalypse (Oscar Isaac), the original and most powerful mutant, embarks on a path of global destruction. Photo Credit: Courtesy Twentieth Century Fox. /
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9. X-Men: Apocalypse (2016)

Imagine you're at a superhero costume party, and in walks X-Men: Apocalypse, dressed in flashy, over-the-top gear, trying to impress everyone with grand gestures and fireworks. That's this movie in a nutshell: it's like that friend who promises an epic night out, but halfway through, you realize you might have had more fun staying in with a good book.

Ranking 9th out of 13 in the X-Men cinematic universe, Apocalypse comes in with a bang but leaves many fans feeling a bit meh. It's not that the movie lacks action or visual pizzazz - oh, it has plenty of that, with cities being upended and the ancient, all-powerful villain Apocalypse making a grand entrance. But it's a bit like eating a giant cotton candy; it looks impressive, but once you're halfway through, you're just left with sticky fingers and a craving for something more substantial. It's truly not fair that such an excellent X-Men villain, played by the wonderfully talented Oscar Isaac, had such a bad introduction. He deserves so much better - maybe even his own movie!

After the critically acclaimed X-Men: Days of Future Past, which was like a gourmet meal blending the best of character development with a side of thrilling action sequences, X-Men: Apocalypse felt like a step back into the fast-food lane. Sure, it had its moments of spectacle - think of Quicksilver's super-speed rescue sequence, which was like a perfectly timed comedic ballet in the midst of chaos. Yet, when it came down to the meat of the story and giving our beloved characters room to grow, Apocalypse felt more like it was going through the motions. The villain, while intimidating in theory and within the X-Men lore, often felt more like a caricature than a genuine threat, leading to a showdown that seemed predetermined rather than earned.

X-Men: Apocalypse is more like planning the ultimate party playlist only to realize you've accidentally put it on shuffle - there are hits, but the flow just isn't there.