All 13 X-Men movies ranked from worst to best

They're all a blend of high-octane action, complex characters, and, let's be honest, a timeline more tangled than the headphones in your pocket, but which X-Men movie takes the number 1 spot?

087_ad_3690_v3099_left.1073_2 – Apocalypse (Oscar Isaac), the original and most powerful mutant, embarks on a path of global destruction. Photo Credit: Courtesy Twentieth Century Fox.
087_ad_3690_v3099_left.1073_2 – Apocalypse (Oscar Isaac), the original and most powerful mutant, embarks on a path of global destruction. Photo Credit: Courtesy Twentieth Century Fox. /
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6. X-Men: Days of Future Past (2014)

Had I been ranking these movies based on my personal opinions and feelings, this one would have easily claimed the number 1 spot. But, since it's based on research and common knowledge, X-Men: Days of Future Past lands into the sixth spot among the baker's dozen of X-Men movies like a superhero landing. This movie is fantastic.

This cinematic sandwich layers the juicy, old-school X-Men we've grown to love (or have a love-hate relationship with) on top of the newer, fresher faces that make us excited about mutant mayhem all over again. It's like going to a high school reunion and discovering your best friend from back in the day can still do that party trick, except the trick now involves bending time and space to save the world. This is such a good movie.

What makes Days of Future Past the mutant Swiss Army knife of the X-Men saga is its clever use of time travel, and the fact that it's done incredibly well. By sending Wolverine's consciousness back to the 1970s - a time of questionable fashion but undeniable groove - it manages to stitch together the fraying edges of the X-Men tapestry into something resembling a coherent storyline. This isn't just about nostalgia or getting another chance to see Hugh Jackman's abs, I mean, Wolverine spar with both friends and foes - it's a narrative reboot that doesn't require you to hit the delete button on what came before. Such. A. Good. Movie.

Instead, Days of Future Past weaves the old and new into a story that's as much about rectifying past mistakes as it is about setting the stage for future adventures. Think of it as the ultimate do-over, one that allows for both reflection and renewal, which is why it lands smack in the middle of the pack - it's not just bridging gaps; it's making sure the X-Men universe is primed for whatever comes next, be it dark, dazzling, or downright mutant.

Honestly, I didn't expect to get so emotional over X-Men as I did in this movie, especially with the "new crowd". Days of Future Past should be a template for how to combine timelines and generations together.