8 most disliked Star Wars shows, ranked

Let's talk about 8 series that, though full of potential, didn't quite hit the mark when it comes to likability or contribution to the overall Star Wars lore.

(L-R): Baylan Skoll (Ray Stevenson) and Ahsoka Tano (Rosario Dawson) in Lucasfilm's STAR WARS: AHSOKA, exclusively on Disney+. ©2023 Lucasfilm Ltd. & TM. All Rights Reserved.
(L-R): Baylan Skoll (Ray Stevenson) and Ahsoka Tano (Rosario Dawson) in Lucasfilm's STAR WARS: AHSOKA, exclusively on Disney+. ©2023 Lucasfilm Ltd. & TM. All Rights Reserved. /
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3. The Mandalorian

The Mandalorian is a show that jetpacked into our hearts with the promise of reviving the gritty, edge-of-the-galaxy charm that made us fall in love with Star Wars in the first place. And then... it lost itself.

Initially, it was like finding a rare, shiny gem in the sands of the extremely overused planet of Tatooine - fresh, exciting, and brimming with the potential of uncharted adventures. The silent, stoic Mando and the irresistibly cute Grogu (Baby Yoda, for the uninitiated), who has the incredible skill of making me squeal every single time it appears on my screen, became overnight sensations, capturing the imaginations of fans across the galaxy. Early seasons had us hooked with their episodic, gunslinging adventures, a formula that felt both nostalgic and refreshingly new. It was a beacon of hope, a sign that perhaps, just maybe, the Star Wars universe still had new tales to tell that could enchant us as the originals did.

However, as we ventured further into the unknown territories of season 2 and the unfortunate season 3, the sheen began to wear off, revealing the crux of our collective disappointment: a creeping sense of directionlessness and a murky focus that left us wandering the Outer Rim without a clear course.

The show, once praised for its tight storytelling and compelling character arcs, started to meander like a lost Bantha, seemingly unsure of its destination. We all began to sense a disturbance in the Force as the narrative seemed to stall, getting bogged down in side quests that, while entertaining, often felt like detours from a more engaging main storyline. The charm of the "monster of the week" format began to wane, leaving audiences craving a deeper, more coherent plot progression. This perceived shift in focus, especially in the third season, led to a cooling of the fervor that initially surrounded the series, placing The Mandalorian in the unexpected company of the most disliked Star Wars shows, despite its early acclaim.

Also, the fact Pedro Pascal, the Internet Daddy behind Mando's mask and suave voice, wasn't there to act out Mando's parts half the time because he was busy filming The Last of Us and other projects left a bitter aftertaste.

In the galaxy of Star Wars fandom, where passions burn as intensely as a Mustafar lava flow, the fall from grace of The Mandalorian serves as a huge reminder of the delicate balance between innovation and expectation. I still love Daddy Pedro, though.